Holodomor
A traffic officer is getting a shoeshine from a young boy with the new Kharkiv government buildings in the background
Description
Creator
Williams, Whiting, 1878-1975, Photographer
Media Type
Image
Text
Item Types
Photographs
Newspaper illustrations
Description
Williams presents us with a wide range of elements to contemplate: In the foreground stands a smartly attired traffic officer – his hat and tunic a striking white. A boy of around 10 in a sleeveless undershirt grins at the photographer as he gives the officer’s tall leather boots a brisk shine. A few men wait while another leaves with what appear to be a drink in hand from a concession that is hidden from view, but bears a large sign saying “Води” meaning in this case water or beverages.

In the background looms the Derzhprom, (Gosprom in Russian), or State Industry Building. It was designed and built in the late 1920’s to provide Kharkiv, the newly designated capital of the Soviet Ukrainian Republic an appropriately impressive, innovative Soviet style structure for the administrative offices of its numerous government owned industries, or “trusts,” as well as other government departments. Williams comments that there are hardly any automobiles visible nearby; just a year earlier, photographer James Abbe shows the building with a row of horse-drawn cabs in the foreground. The impressive Derzhprom, like the smartly dressed officer with no traffic to direct, are but two examples of the lengths to which Stalin’s government went to present a façade of power, progress and prosperity.
Notes
Photo taken August, 1933.

This photo was later published with the first of 2 articles by Whiting Williams in a London weekly titled Answers: “My Journey Through Famine-Stricken Russia,” February 24, 1934, p.17.

See Special Features menu to link to the article.

The original photograph and the published version are both shown.
Inscriptions
Caption on back of photograph: “The offices of the various Government ‘trusts’ or employing companies in the Republic of the Ukraine, and a traffic cop – everything splendid except that, outside street cars and official autos, there’s no traffic.”

Caption under photo in Answers: “The lighter side of Russia today – a traffic-policeman has a shoe-shine outside the great new office blocks erected at Kharkov.”
Date of Original
1933
Date Of Event
1933
Subject(s)
Local identifier
PD205
Collection
Whiting Williams
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Kharkiv, Ukraine
    Latitude: 49.98081 Longitude: 36.25272
Copyright Statement
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation
for original: [caption ]; [Container 1, Folder 9 ] PG 89 Whiting Williams Photographs, Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH. Retrieved from: http://vitacollections.ca/HREC-holodomorphotodirectory/3634077/data

for published version: Williams, Whiting. “My Journey Through Famine-Stricken Russia,” Answers (weekly). London, February 24, 1934, p.17. Retrieved from: http://vitacollections.ca/HREC-holodomorphotodirectory/3634077/image/4224364
Location of Original
[Container 1, Folder 9 ] PG 89 Whiting Williams Photographs, Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH.
Terms of Use
Reproduction of images is restricted to fair use for personal study or research. Any other use requires a contractual agreement with the Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH. Contact the Society directly at:
https://www.wrhs.org/research/library/services/
Reproduction Notes
Reproduced by contractual agreement with the Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH.
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A traffic officer is getting a shoeshine from a young boy with the new Kharkiv government buildings in the background


Williams presents us with a wide range of elements to contemplate: In the foreground stands a smartly attired traffic officer – his hat and tunic a striking white. A boy of around 10 in a sleeveless undershirt grins at the photographer as he gives the officer’s tall leather boots a brisk shine. A few men wait while another leaves with what appear to be a drink in hand from a concession that is hidden from view, but bears a large sign saying “Води” meaning in this case water or beverages.

In the background looms the Derzhprom, (Gosprom in Russian), or State Industry Building. It was designed and built in the late 1920’s to provide Kharkiv, the newly designated capital of the Soviet Ukrainian Republic an appropriately impressive, innovative Soviet style structure for the administrative offices of its numerous government owned industries, or “trusts,” as well as other government departments. Williams comments that there are hardly any automobiles visible nearby; just a year earlier, photographer James Abbe shows the building with a row of horse-drawn cabs in the foreground. The impressive Derzhprom, like the smartly dressed officer with no traffic to direct, are but two examples of the lengths to which Stalin’s government went to present a façade of power, progress and prosperity.