Holodomor
Long line of people waiting to buy bread in Ukraine
Description
Creator
Williams, Whiting, 1878-1975, Photographer
Media Type
Image
Text
Item Types
Photographs
Newspaper illustrations
Description
The original photo that provided the basis for the significantly cropped version appearing in Answers is not in the Williams archives, unfortunately; therefore we lack not only a complete captured image, but also any possible annotations that Williams may have made on the back of the photo. We are left with a rather indistinct newsprint quality reproduction of a long line of people of all ages, without the visual context of the immediate surroundings and no information about the city or town in which this photo was taken.

Nonetheless, both in the article and in Williams’ diary notes, we read that such lines were present everywhere he visited in Ukraine during his 2 week visit. The caption in the article also makes clear that not everyone is entitled to a bread ration. People could only obtain an allocation of food products in certain distribution centers according to the limits prescribed in their ration cards. The cards were issued based on one’s government assigned rank in the proletariat (non rural workers) and to approved urban residents. Rural residents were not allowed ration cards at all. A ration card did not guarantee that the food would be available, however.
Notes
Photo taken August, 1933.

The original photo is now missing. However, it was edited and published with the second of 2 articles by Whiting Williams in a London weekly titled Answers: Williams, Whiting. “Why Russia is Hungry,” March 3, 1934, p.3.

See Special Features menu to link to the article.

The published version is shown here.
Inscriptions
Caption under photo in Answers: “Even those who are still at work in Russia, and who, therefore, are entitled to a ration of bread, have to wait – sometimes for hours – in long queues before they can get it.”
Date of Original
1933
Date Of Event
1933
Subject(s)
Local identifier
PD207
Collection
Whiting Williams
Language of Item
English
Copyright Statement
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation
Williams, Whiting. “Why Russia is Hungry,” Answers (weekly). London, March 3, 1934, p.3. Retrieved from: http://vitacollections.ca/HREC-holodomorphotodirectory/3634148/data
Location of Original
[Container 1, Folder 9 ] PG 89 Whiting Williams Photographs, Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH.
Terms of Use
Reproduction of images is restricted to fair use for personal study or research. Any other use requires a contractual agreement with the Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH. Contact the Society directly at:
https://www.wrhs.org/research/library/services/
Reproduction Notes
Reproduced by contractual agreement with the Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH.
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.

thumbnail








Long line of people waiting to buy bread in Ukraine


The original photo that provided the basis for the significantly cropped version appearing in Answers is not in the Williams archives, unfortunately; therefore we lack not only a complete captured image, but also any possible annotations that Williams may have made on the back of the photo. We are left with a rather indistinct newsprint quality reproduction of a long line of people of all ages, without the visual context of the immediate surroundings and no information about the city or town in which this photo was taken.

Nonetheless, both in the article and in Williams’ diary notes, we read that such lines were present everywhere he visited in Ukraine during his 2 week visit. The caption in the article also makes clear that not everyone is entitled to a bread ration. People could only obtain an allocation of food products in certain distribution centers according to the limits prescribed in their ration cards. The cards were issued based on one’s government assigned rank in the proletariat (non rural workers) and to approved urban residents. Rural residents were not allowed ration cards at all. A ration card did not guarantee that the food would be available, however.