Holodomor
Young urban workers helping to harvest grain at a model collective farm pose for the photographer
Description
Creator
Williams, Whiting, 1878-1975, Photographer
Media Type
Image
Text
Item Types
Photographs
Newspaper illustrations
Description
This scene was taken when Williams was visiting a collective farm as part of an official tour. Most of the women visible in the photo are fresh recruits from a city, “volunteered” temporarily from among students or urban office workers, among them Komsomol members. Because so many farmers had died and those remaining were often too weak from hunger to work, many such urban work brigades were sent out across Ukraine for the 1933 harvest. In this group, a young farm boy stands with them, and an older woman member of the collective farm stands further back.
Unaccustomed to such work and fed the barely subsistence level rations given the collective farm workers, Williams was told confidentially that many of these volunteers became seriously ill by the end of their assignment, and some never recovered.
Notes
Photo taken August, 1933.

This photo was later published with the second of 2 articles by Whiting Williams in a London weekly titled Answers: Williams, Whiting. “Why Russia is Hungry,” March 3, 1934, p.3.

See Special Features menu to link to the article.

The original photograph and the published version are both shown.
Inscriptions
Caption on back of original photograph: “A ‘brigade’ of ‘voluntary’ office workers from the city endeavoring to make up for the lack of farm workers.”

Caption under photo in Answers: “'Volunteer’ harvesters on one of the farms. Many of the peasants are dead or in exile, and large numbers of those who remain are too weak and ill to do any real work.”
Date of Original
1933
Date Of Event
1933
Subject(s)
Local identifier
PD208
Collection
Whiting Williams
Language of Item
English
Copyright Statement
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation
for original: [caption ]; [Container 1, Folder 9 ] PG 89 Whiting Williams Photographs, Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH. Retrieved from: http://vitacollections.ca/HREC-holodomorphotodirectory/3634245/data

for published version: Williams, Whiting. “Why Russia is Hungry,” Answers (weekly). London, March 3, 1934, p.3. Retrieved from: http://vitacollections.ca/HREC-holodomorphotodirectory/3634245/image/4224341
Location of Original
[Container 1, Folder 9 ] PG 89 Whiting Williams Photographs, Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH.
Terms of Use
Reproduction of images is restricted to fair use for personal study or research. Any other use requires a contractual agreement with the Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH. Contact the Society directly at:
https://www.wrhs.org/research/library/services/
Reproduction Notes
Reproduced by contractual agreement with the Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH.
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Young urban workers helping to harvest grain at a model collective farm pose for the photographer


This scene was taken when Williams was visiting a collective farm as part of an official tour. Most of the women visible in the photo are fresh recruits from a city, “volunteered” temporarily from among students or urban office workers, among them Komsomol members. Because so many farmers had died and those remaining were often too weak from hunger to work, many such urban work brigades were sent out across Ukraine for the 1933 harvest. In this group, a young farm boy stands with them, and an older woman member of the collective farm stands further back.
Unaccustomed to such work and fed the barely subsistence level rations given the collective farm workers, Williams was told confidentially that many of these volunteers became seriously ill by the end of their assignment, and some never recovered.