Holodomor
Non-Holodomor: A youth crazed with hunger sits in a basin in a Ukrainian village
Description
Creator
unknown, Photographer
Media Type
Image
Text
Item Types
Photographs
Pamphlet illustrations
Description
This is one of a set of 20 photographs that illustrate La Famine en Ukraine, rapport, by Vidkun Quisling, April 30, 1922, described in the notes below. The photographs are housed among the documents of the "Union international de secours aux enfants" deposited in the Canton Archives of Geneva. Another nearly identical series of 17 photographs depicting famine conditions in Ukraine are also deposited at the Canton Archives. The latter photographs were in the possession of the Ukrainian Red Cross and sent abroad in 1921-1922 to various charitable organizations and to the Ukrainian diaspora press.

In 1921,the normally abundant southern steppe areas of Ukraine were suffering from drought and subsequent starvation as severe as in the Volga regions of Russia. However, the Bolsheviks in Moscow requisitioned the harvests from throughout Ukraine to feed the starving populations of Russia’s agricultural regions.The dire conditions in the Ukrainian steppes were further compounded as large numbers of migrants from Russia’s famine zones arrived, expecting to find plentiful sustenance.

When word of famine in Ukraine reached the American Relief Administration (ARA) in late 1921, their investigators were initially denied permission by Moscow to inspect the area. Eventually, Moscow relented and the ARA investigators discovered alarming conditions and urged immediate relief. Following extensive negotiations with the Kremlin and Kharkiv, the ARA was finally allowed to open food kitchens and medical relief programs in January of 1922 throughout the famine-stricken regions of southern Ukraine.
Notes
Photo taken between 1921-1922.

Photo source: Information report series published by the Comité International de Secours a la Russie, Haut Commissariat du Dr. Nansen: no. 22: La Famine en Ukraine, rapport, by Vidkun Quisling. April 30, 1922. Genève: Imp. de H. Vollet . p.17. http://diasporiana.org.ua/wp-content/uploads/books/16481/file.pdf

This photo appears as #7 of 17 photographs that were mailed by the Ukrainian Red Cross with a separate numbered list in an official envelope date-stamped as arriving in Geneva on May 5, 1922. They are now housed among the documents of the "Union international de secours aux enfants" deposited in the Canton Archives of Geneva, Switzerland. (Serbyn 1992.)
Listed as: #7: "Хлопець села Благовіщенка Іляріон Нищенко, що через голод убив свого З-літнього брата і з'їв його." "Un garçon de Blahovichtchenka qui avait tué et mangé son petit frère (gubernia de Zaporijia)." [A boy from Blahovishchenka who killed and ate his brother (gubernia of Zaporizhia ).]


Also available for viewing and download, with limitations, from the International Committee of the Red Cross, Audiovisual Archives, https://avarchives.icrc.org/Picture/9384
Location misidentified as Russia.


Misattributed as documentation of the 1930’s Soviet famine:

Ammende, Ewald. 1936. Human Life in Russia. London: G. Allen & Unwin.), f.p.65. (reprinted in 1984 as: Ammende, Ewald, and James E. Mace. 1984. Human life in Russia. Cleveland : Zubal. )
Caption: “Another child victim of the famine”

See also: Related Features on right.

Inscriptions
Caption: “Cannibal de Zaporoshie: il a mange sa soeur.” [Cannibal from Zaporizhia: he had eaten his sister]
Date of Original
1921-1922
Date Of Event
1921-1923
Subject(s)
Personal Name(s)
Quisling, Vidkun
Corporate Name(s)
American Relief Administration ; Comité International de Secours a la Russie ; International Save the Children Union ; Nansen Mission ; Red Cross Society of Ukraine (1918-1923) ; Union international de secours aux enfants
Local identifier
PD804
Collection
Select 1920s famine photos from Ukraine and Russia
Language of Item
English; French
Geographic Coverage
  • Zaporizhia, Ukraine
    Latitude: 47.45397 Longitude: 34.83369
  • Zaporizhia, Ukraine
    Latitude: 47.27304 Longitude: 36.77681
Copyright Statement
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Copyright Date
1922
Recommended Citation
Information / Comité International de Secours a la Russie, Haut Commissariat du Dr. Nansen: no. 22: La Famine en Ukraine, rapport, by Vidkun Quisling. April 30, 1922, p.17. http://diasporiana.org.ua/wp-content/uploads/books/16481/file.pdf
Retrieved from: http://vitacollections.ca/HREC-holodomorphotodirectory/3636163/data
Location of Original
Original photograph used in the cited publications held by: Archives d'Etat de Genève (State Archives of the Canton of Geneva), Switzerland.


Reproduction Notes
Reproduced from the digitized version of the publication cited above.
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Non-Holodomor: A youth crazed with hunger sits in a basin in a Ukrainian village


This is one of a set of 20 photographs that illustrate La Famine en Ukraine, rapport, by Vidkun Quisling, April 30, 1922, described in the notes below. The photographs are housed among the documents of the "Union international de secours aux enfants" deposited in the Canton Archives of Geneva. Another nearly identical series of 17 photographs depicting famine conditions in Ukraine are also deposited at the Canton Archives. The latter photographs were in the possession of the Ukrainian Red Cross and sent abroad in 1921-1922 to various charitable organizations and to the Ukrainian diaspora press.

In 1921,the normally abundant southern steppe areas of Ukraine were suffering from drought and subsequent starvation as severe as in the Volga regions of Russia. However, the Bolsheviks in Moscow requisitioned the harvests from throughout Ukraine to feed the starving populations of Russia’s agricultural regions.The dire conditions in the Ukrainian steppes were further compounded as large numbers of migrants from Russia’s famine zones arrived, expecting to find plentiful sustenance.

When word of famine in Ukraine reached the American Relief Administration (ARA) in late 1921, their investigators were initially denied permission by Moscow to inspect the area. Eventually, Moscow relented and the ARA investigators discovered alarming conditions and urged immediate relief. Following extensive negotiations with the Kremlin and Kharkiv, the ARA was finally allowed to open food kitchens and medical relief programs in January of 1922 throughout the famine-stricken regions of southern Ukraine.