48 Sanford Street


Description
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Description:
Historical Name: St. Paul’s Anglican Church
Location: 48 Sanford Street
Description: Legal: Lots 28 to 32 N Sanford St. Lot 1 W Kinsley Avenue
Property: Church
Date of Construction: 1862
Heritage Status: Listed

Summary of Cultural Attributes:
Historical: St. Paul's Anglican Church is situated on a 2/3-acre plot deeded in 1849 by Sheriff Henry Ruttau to Thomas D. Sanford, after whom the street is named. Thomas served as Brighton's reeve, 1908-09. In 1857, the property was acquired by John E. Proctor and in 1861 by the Synod of the Diocese of Toronto. (OLR records indicate that the grant was made in 1869). In 1862, the cornerstone was dedicated by the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free Masons of Canada. The church was named St. Paul's by a parishioner and local businessman, Milton Kingsley Lockwood, who became the first warden.

The first funeral recorded was for William Proctor in 1867; the first baptism was Hannah Jane Alexander in 1863; the first bride to be married was Amanda Marsh.

Fire destroyed much of the west end of the church and many records, but it was restored and they added electricity and a fellowship room. In 1941, the church interior was renovated and in 1951 a Parish Hall added (rebuilt and enlarged in 1991). In 1961, new pews were consecrated by the Bishop of Toronto and in 1981 the church tower was rebuilt.

In 1967, the Synod acquired three contiguous lots and in 1985 built a rectory facing Kingsley Avenue. In 1998, the congregation celebrated its 135th anniversary with Bishop Douglas Blackwell presiding. Over the years the Church has had 25 Ministers, 75 Wardens, and 18 organists.

Architectural: The church, frequently called the White Church on the Hill is characterized by Gothic Revival with Lancet pointed openings. It has stained- glass windows and today it houses a stained-glass window from the old Presbyterian Church that stood on Brighton's Main Street. (It had served the community from 1878 to 2007, when it was demolished).
The church facade has changed over the years. Initially it was board-and-batten, then stuccoed in 1928, followed by hardboard siding and then in 1991 was restored to a board-and­batten style, with some stuccoed areas. The new boards are 1" x 12" pine and the battens trapezoidal-shaped pine.

The church has a square-base bell tower (the bells were purchased in 1886), topped by a conical, hexagonal spire with a cross on top.
Sources: MPAC; OLR Records; That's Just the Way We Were, 2006, p.111-2; Doors Open 2008.
Notes:
St Paul's Anglican Church
Publisher:
Municipality of Brighton Register of Properties of Cultural Heritage Value or Interest
Local identifier:
abdap_munb-044
Language of Item:
English
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Brighton Digital Archives
Email
Agency street/mail address

50 Chatten Road
Brighton, ON K0K1H0

Mailing address:
c/o Catherine Stutt
1 Moran Drive
Brighton, Ontario
K0K 1H0

48 Sanford Street
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48 Sanford Street


Historical Name: St. Paul’s Anglican Church
Location: 48 Sanford Street
Description: Legal: Lots 28 to 32 N Sanford St. Lot 1 W Kinsley Avenue
Property: Church
Date of Construction: 1862
Heritage Status: Listed

Summary of Cultural Attributes:
Historical: St. Paul's Anglican Church is situated on a 2/3-acre plot deeded in 1849 by Sheriff Henry Ruttau to Thomas D. Sanford, after whom the street is named. Thomas served as Brighton's reeve, 1908-09. In 1857, the property was acquired by John E. Proctor and in 1861 by the Synod of the Diocese of Toronto. (OLR records indicate that the grant was made in 1869). In 1862, the cornerstone was dedicated by the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free Masons of Canada. The church was named St. Paul's by a parishioner and local businessman, Milton Kingsley Lockwood, who became the first warden.

The first funeral recorded was for William Proctor in 1867; the first baptism was Hannah Jane Alexander in 1863; the first bride to be married was Amanda Marsh.

Fire destroyed much of the west end of the church and many records, but it was restored and they added electricity and a fellowship room. In 1941, the church interior was renovated and in 1951 a Parish Hall added (rebuilt and enlarged in 1991). In 1961, new pews were consecrated by the Bishop of Toronto and in 1981 the church tower was rebuilt.

In 1967, the Synod acquired three contiguous lots and in 1985 built a rectory facing Kingsley Avenue. In 1998, the congregation celebrated its 135th anniversary with Bishop Douglas Blackwell presiding. Over the years the Church has had 25 Ministers, 75 Wardens, and 18 organists.

Architectural: The church, frequently called the White Church on the Hill is characterized by Gothic Revival with Lancet pointed openings. It has stained- glass windows and today it houses a stained-glass window from the old Presbyterian Church that stood on Brighton's Main Street. (It had served the community from 1878 to 2007, when it was demolished).
The church facade has changed over the years. Initially it was board-and-batten, then stuccoed in 1928, followed by hardboard siding and then in 1991 was restored to a board-and­batten style, with some stuccoed areas. The new boards are 1" x 12" pine and the battens trapezoidal-shaped pine.

The church has a square-base bell tower (the bells were purchased in 1886), topped by a conical, hexagonal spire with a cross on top.
Sources: MPAC; OLR Records; That's Just the Way We Were, 2006, p.111-2; Doors Open 2008.