50 Prince Edward Street


Description
Media Type:
Image
Text
Description:
Historical Name: Hilda Montgomery House
Location of Property: 50 Prince Edward Street, Brighton
Legal Description: Plan 65 Lot 4 RP 38R2825 Parts 1 and 2
Description: 1 ½ storey house
Date of Construction: 1910 at the present site
Heritage Designation: Listed

Summary of Cultural Attributes:
Historical: This house is now located on a town lot that was part of a 200-acre Crown grant to James Richardson in 1809 for all of Lot 1, Concession 1. The house was initially built in the 1880s by the Snelgrove family, farther down the street on land later acquired by the Canadian Northern Railway Company. The house was then moved in 1910 to its present location by Mabel J. Lockwood. In 1920, she and her husband Thomas Lockwood sold it to Wesley Montgomery and then following his death it went to Hilda A. Montgomery.

Hilda became a legend in Brighton for her work as a grade one school teacher at the Elizabeth Street School, a Sunday School teacher, and Sunday afternoon teaching children at a cottage in Gosport. For her dedication to the community, she received among other honours the Queen's Jubilee medal in 1977. A park in Gosport named after her. She married in later years and in 1985 sold her house. A year later, a four-plex housing unit was added to the property.

Architectural: The original 1 ½-storey house displays a Queen Anne style with an arched, single-window front gable over a three-window bay and two recessed wings - the larger featuring an upper balcony accessed by an extended dormer, and a lower closed-in porch with a turret on the end. The turret has a steeply pitched steel roof topped by a fancy metal spire and finial. The roof is steeply pitched, now covered with red asphalt shingles. The house is believed to have been remodeled significantly in 1986. On the inside provisions were made for two or three rental units, all windows and doors were replaced and the exterior was covered with yellow vinyl siding.

Sources: MPAC; OLR Records; Pictorial Brighton, 1859-1984, p. 32; That's Just the Way We Were, 2006, pps 281-83.

Publisher:
Municipality of Brighton Register of Properties of Cultural Heritage Value or Interest
Local identifier:
abdap_munb-038
Language of Item:
English
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Brighton Digital Archives
Email
Agency street/mail address

50 Chatten Road
Brighton, ON K0K1H0

Mailing address:
c/o Catherine Stutt
1 Moran Drive
Brighton, Ontario
K0K 1H0

50 Prince Edward Street
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50 Prince Edward Street


Historical Name: Hilda Montgomery House
Location of Property: 50 Prince Edward Street, Brighton
Legal Description: Plan 65 Lot 4 RP 38R2825 Parts 1 and 2
Description: 1 ½ storey house
Date of Construction: 1910 at the present site
Heritage Designation: Listed

Summary of Cultural Attributes:
Historical: This house is now located on a town lot that was part of a 200-acre Crown grant to James Richardson in 1809 for all of Lot 1, Concession 1. The house was initially built in the 1880s by the Snelgrove family, farther down the street on land later acquired by the Canadian Northern Railway Company. The house was then moved in 1910 to its present location by Mabel J. Lockwood. In 1920, she and her husband Thomas Lockwood sold it to Wesley Montgomery and then following his death it went to Hilda A. Montgomery.

Hilda became a legend in Brighton for her work as a grade one school teacher at the Elizabeth Street School, a Sunday School teacher, and Sunday afternoon teaching children at a cottage in Gosport. For her dedication to the community, she received among other honours the Queen's Jubilee medal in 1977. A park in Gosport named after her. She married in later years and in 1985 sold her house. A year later, a four-plex housing unit was added to the property.

Architectural: The original 1 ½-storey house displays a Queen Anne style with an arched, single-window front gable over a three-window bay and two recessed wings - the larger featuring an upper balcony accessed by an extended dormer, and a lower closed-in porch with a turret on the end. The turret has a steeply pitched steel roof topped by a fancy metal spire and finial. The roof is steeply pitched, now covered with red asphalt shingles. The house is believed to have been remodeled significantly in 1986. On the inside provisions were made for two or three rental units, all windows and doors were replaced and the exterior was covered with yellow vinyl siding.

Sources: MPAC; OLR Records; Pictorial Brighton, 1859-1984, p. 32; That's Just the Way We Were, 2006, pps 281-83.