56 Sanford Street


Description
Media Type:
Image
Text
Description:
Historical Name: Ketchum House
Location: 56 Sanford Street
Legal Description: Plan 28 Lot 35 N/S Sanford Part Lot 1 W/S Kingsley being RP 39R7752 Part 1
Property: House
Date of Construction: Circa 1880
Heritage Status: Listed

Summary of Cultural Attributes:
Historical: This house is located on a town lot that is part of a 200-acre Crown Patent in 1803 to Edward Goodyear for all of Lot 1, Concession 2. In 1872, the lot being about 1/5th of an acre was acquired by Maitland P. Ketchum, a Main Street merchant who is believed to have built the house circa 1880. In 1915, he granted it for $1 to Edwin J. Nesbitt, who in later years became the owner of E. J. Nesbitt Canning Company on Richardson Street. In 1958, it went to Robert S. and Katherine J. Nesbitt and they in turn sold it in 1981 to Brian D. Binnington and Judith A. Holdsworth. The present owner, Peter K. Gaudreault acquired the property in 1999.

Architectural: This red brick with white trim, two-storey house features both Georgian and
Italianate styles. The south-facing front displays Georgian symmetry with two single-hung windows on the main floor, each topped by double-arched Florentine windows on the upper floor; the centre of the lower front has a three-Romanesque window bay, topped by a small balcony and a Florentine-styled door with side windows. Most of the windows are replacements. All Florentine windows have rounded-top shutters, where as the rectangular windows have regular shutters; all are painted black. The main part of the house is rectangular with a hipped roof and having a fairly wide overhang; the soffits and fascia are now aluminum. The house has a rear tail that is believed to have been added later (its windows have slightly arched lintels) and has a large porch (believed to be part of the original house) on the west side; it features three sides of large eight-over-16 pane windows, the main entrance with a Romanesque arch, and a balcony with a prominent balustrade supported by sturdy balusters.

Sources: MPAC; OLR Records; Susan Brose, The History of Brighton's Businesses 1816 to 2009, p. 10.
Publisher:
Municipality of Brighton Register of Properties of Cultural Heritage Value or Interest
Local identifier:
abdap_munb-047
Language of Item:
English
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Brighton Digital Archives
Email
Agency street/mail address

50 Chatten Road
Brighton, ON K0K1H0

Mailing address:
c/o Catherine Stutt
1 Moran Drive
Brighton, Ontario
K0K 1H0

56 Sanford Street
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56 Sanford Street


Historical Name: Ketchum House
Location: 56 Sanford Street
Legal Description: Plan 28 Lot 35 N/S Sanford Part Lot 1 W/S Kingsley being RP 39R7752 Part 1
Property: House
Date of Construction: Circa 1880
Heritage Status: Listed

Summary of Cultural Attributes:
Historical: This house is located on a town lot that is part of a 200-acre Crown Patent in 1803 to Edward Goodyear for all of Lot 1, Concession 2. In 1872, the lot being about 1/5th of an acre was acquired by Maitland P. Ketchum, a Main Street merchant who is believed to have built the house circa 1880. In 1915, he granted it for $1 to Edwin J. Nesbitt, who in later years became the owner of E. J. Nesbitt Canning Company on Richardson Street. In 1958, it went to Robert S. and Katherine J. Nesbitt and they in turn sold it in 1981 to Brian D. Binnington and Judith A. Holdsworth. The present owner, Peter K. Gaudreault acquired the property in 1999.

Architectural: This red brick with white trim, two-storey house features both Georgian and
Italianate styles. The south-facing front displays Georgian symmetry with two single-hung windows on the main floor, each topped by double-arched Florentine windows on the upper floor; the centre of the lower front has a three-Romanesque window bay, topped by a small balcony and a Florentine-styled door with side windows. Most of the windows are replacements. All Florentine windows have rounded-top shutters, where as the rectangular windows have regular shutters; all are painted black. The main part of the house is rectangular with a hipped roof and having a fairly wide overhang; the soffits and fascia are now aluminum. The house has a rear tail that is believed to have been added later (its windows have slightly arched lintels) and has a large porch (believed to be part of the original house) on the west side; it features three sides of large eight-over-16 pane windows, the main entrance with a Romanesque arch, and a balcony with a prominent balustrade supported by sturdy balusters.

Sources: MPAC; OLR Records; Susan Brose, The History of Brighton's Businesses 1816 to 2009, p. 10.