The "Kingston" Sails for the Last Time.


Description
Media Type:
Image
Text
Item Types:
Cards
Greeting cards
Description:
Folded card with black and white photo of steamer Kingston on its last voyage from Toronto Harbour to Thousand Islands.
Reverse:
"THE "KINGSTON" SAILS FOR THE LAST TIME
On Saturday, September 17th, 1949, at 2:40 P.M., the old passenger steamer "Kingston" sailed from Toronto on her final voyage to the Thousand Islands, thus closing a career which had lasted for almost half a century and bringing to an end overnight steamship service on Lake Ontario. Few of those who watched her in the brilliant sunshine on that breezy afternoon had any indication that she was sailing for the last time, but they were witnessing the end of an era.
The "Kingston" was built in Toronto by the Canadian Shipbuilding Company at the foot of Brock Street, (now Spadina Avenue), in 1901, and was a slightly larger vessel than the "Toronto", constructed by the same yard in 1899. Operated by the Richelieu and Ontario Navigation Company, they sailed daily from Toronto during the summer season and formed a link in the famous all-water route from Niagara to the Sea. In 1913, both vessels passed into the fleet of Canada Steamship Lines and continued to sail through the beautiful Thousand Islands, the most scenic steamer cruise in Canada.
The handsome interior of the "Kingston", with its ornate plaster moulding, gave an impression of elegance reminiscent of the great homes of Europe. An air of hospitality pervaded the ship and this was enhanced by the courtesy of the men who commanded her, from Captain Henry Esford, her first master, to Captain Harry Webster, who was on the bridge when this photograph was taken. The "Kingston" will be remembered with affection by a multitude of people who viewed the passing of this grand old steamer with the deepest personal regret."
Inscriptions:
Inside a card:
"Sincere good wishes for every happiness at Christmas and in the New Year.
Alan Howard

908, Darwood Court
60, Tyndall Avenue
Toronto, Ontario"
Date Of Event:
17 Sep 1949
Dimensions:
Width: 18.4 cm
Height: 14.3 cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
QC00033
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.634444 Longitude: -79.370833
Donor:
Huggins, Jean A. E. (1896-1990)
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Niagara-on-the-Lake Public Library
Email
Website
Agency street/mail address

10 Anderson Lane P.O. Box 430
Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0
905-468-2023

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The "Kingston" Sails for the Last Time.


Folded card with black and white photo of steamer Kingston on its last voyage from Toronto Harbour to Thousand Islands.
Reverse:
"THE "KINGSTON" SAILS FOR THE LAST TIME
On Saturday, September 17th, 1949, at 2:40 P.M., the old passenger steamer "Kingston" sailed from Toronto on her final voyage to the Thousand Islands, thus closing a career which had lasted for almost half a century and bringing to an end overnight steamship service on Lake Ontario. Few of those who watched her in the brilliant sunshine on that breezy afternoon had any indication that she was sailing for the last time, but they were witnessing the end of an era.
The "Kingston" was built in Toronto by the Canadian Shipbuilding Company at the foot of Brock Street, (now Spadina Avenue), in 1901, and was a slightly larger vessel than the "Toronto", constructed by the same yard in 1899. Operated by the Richelieu and Ontario Navigation Company, they sailed daily from Toronto during the summer season and formed a link in the famous all-water route from Niagara to the Sea. In 1913, both vessels passed into the fleet of Canada Steamship Lines and continued to sail through the beautiful Thousand Islands, the most scenic steamer cruise in Canada.
The handsome interior of the "Kingston", with its ornate plaster moulding, gave an impression of elegance reminiscent of the great homes of Europe. An air of hospitality pervaded the ship and this was enhanced by the courtesy of the men who commanded her, from Captain Henry Esford, her first master, to Captain Harry Webster, who was on the bridge when this photograph was taken. The "Kingston" will be remembered with affection by a multitude of people who viewed the passing of this grand old steamer with the deepest personal regret."