Toronto's Passenger Fleet in 1918
:


Description
Media Type:
Image
Text
Item Types:
Cards
Greeting cards
Description:
Folded card with black and white photograph of steamers Chippewa, Toronto, Corona, Dalhousie City, Modjeska, Kingston and Cayuga at Toronto Harbour.
Reverse:
TORONTO'S PASSENGER FLEET IN 1918
Passenger steamers played an important part in the life of the city when this photograph was taken from the top of the Toronto Harbour Commissioners' new building on April 26th, 1918. The view to the eastward from the foot of Bay Street presents a colourful scene: fitting out has commenced and painters are at work as the ships are prepared for a busy season of voyages across Lake Ontario.
In the foreground is the big Niagara steamer, "Chippewa," a sidewheeler, driven by a vertical beam-engine and probably the most comfortable day steamer ever to sail from Toronto. Immediately beyond is the "Toronto" of the Thousand Islands Service and the "Corona" of the Niagara Line may be seen at the extreme left. The funnel of the "Dalhousie City" can be identified by the wisp of steam, as she is already in service. In the same slip, the Hamilton steamer, "Modjeska," lays with her bow visible headed toward the Bay. The Thousand Island steamer, "Kingston," with her tall, twin funnels, can be seen in the background alongside the "Cayuga," flagship of the Niagara fleet.
Familiar landmarks are the lofty chimneys of the Toronto Electric Light Company at the foot of Scott Street and the Poison Iron Works jutting out into the Bay at Sherbourne Street. The dredge, "Dragon Rouge," is busily at work deepening the harbour near Yonge Street slip. The large tug in the immediate foreground is unidentified, but is probably the "Magnolia."
No trace of this once-familiar scene exists today, the entire area having been filled in and the harbour extended to the southward. The last passenger steamers have gone from Toronto Bay, but they have left in their wake a host of happy memories which will long remain."
Inscriptions:
Christmas greetings from Alan Howard (inside a card).
Place of Publication:
Toronto, Ontario
Date of Original:
19180426
Dimensions:
Width: 18.4 cm
Height: 14.3 cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
QC00036
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.634444 Longitude: -79.370833
Donor:
Huggins, Jean A. E. (1895-1989)
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Niagara-on-the-Lake Public Library
Email
Website
Agency street/mail address

10 Anderson Lane P.O. Box 430
Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0
905-468-2023

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Toronto's Passenger Fleet in 1918


Folded card with black and white photograph of steamers Chippewa, Toronto, Corona, Dalhousie City, Modjeska, Kingston and Cayuga at Toronto Harbour.
Reverse:
TORONTO'S PASSENGER FLEET IN 1918
Passenger steamers played an important part in the life of the city when this photograph was taken from the top of the Toronto Harbour Commissioners' new building on April 26th, 1918. The view to the eastward from the foot of Bay Street presents a colourful scene: fitting out has commenced and painters are at work as the ships are prepared for a busy season of voyages across Lake Ontario.
In the foreground is the big Niagara steamer, "Chippewa," a sidewheeler, driven by a vertical beam-engine and probably the most comfortable day steamer ever to sail from Toronto. Immediately beyond is the "Toronto" of the Thousand Islands Service and the "Corona" of the Niagara Line may be seen at the extreme left. The funnel of the "Dalhousie City" can be identified by the wisp of steam, as she is already in service. In the same slip, the Hamilton steamer, "Modjeska," lays with her bow visible headed toward the Bay. The Thousand Island steamer, "Kingston," with her tall, twin funnels, can be seen in the background alongside the "Cayuga," flagship of the Niagara fleet.
Familiar landmarks are the lofty chimneys of the Toronto Electric Light Company at the foot of Scott Street and the Poison Iron Works jutting out into the Bay at Sherbourne Street. The dredge, "Dragon Rouge," is busily at work deepening the harbour near Yonge Street slip. The large tug in the immediate foreground is unidentified, but is probably the "Magnolia."
No trace of this once-familiar scene exists today, the entire area having been filled in and the harbour extended to the southward. The last passenger steamers have gone from Toronto Bay, but they have left in their wake a host of happy memories which will long remain."