Shingwauk Home with its family


Description
Media Type:
Image
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:
Sepia coloured photograph of Indian boys and girls, standing on the ground, the stairs and the ladders, taken outside of a big stone building.

The Rev. Edward Francis Wilson was a missionary among the Indians (Shingwauk mission) and a principal of residential school at Garden River, near Sault Ste. Marie, between 1872 and 1893.

Notes:
Ladies Sewing Party
After the arrival of the McMurrays, the interest of the women of the parish became focused on the mission that the McMurrays had been part of in Sault Ste. Marie, called the Shingwauk and Wawanash homes. A number of photographs in St. Mark's archives show pictures of the mission there. According to a sermon of Rev. H.D. Maclean this interest came from an address given by Miss Baxter. "This suggestion was made to the daughters of the late Dr. Beaven, who offered their house as a place where the meetings for sewing might be held, (who) talked to the women of the Parish, endeavoring to interest them in the good cause, and (who) gradually drew together a band of workers who met there to sew, making garments for the boys and girls of the Shingwauk and Wawanash Homes at Sault St. Marie, but especially for the child adopted by the Parish." This group became known as "The Ladies Sewing Party".
Dr. James Beaven was a professor at King's College, later the University of Toronto. Following his retirement he came to Niagara where he died in 1875. His daughters Blanche and Mary were active in Parish life and their names appear frequently in the minutes of the Women's Auxiliary. The Beavens were soon joined by Mrs. Morson and for a while only the three carried on the activity of preparing clothing for missions. Charlotte (Johnson) McMurray died two years later, but the work of this group, although undocumented appears to have carried on until the formation of the Women's Auxiliary.

Women's Auxiliary
At a special meeting of the Women's Auxiliary on 15 September 1898, Miss Roe read "a short sketch of work for Missions in St. Mark's Parish from its beginning in 1876 to the present time". The use of this date indicates that the Auxiliary recognised its origins from the Ladies Sewing Party. According to Maclean's sermon, it was in 1891 that "Mrs. Gregory, the Diocesan Organizing Secretary, organized a branch of the Women's Auxiliary to Missions in this Parish, with a membership of 47. The greater number of these were the members of the Ladies Sewing Party, who thus saw not only their membership increased but their sphere of usefulness much enlarged. They were now a part of a national organization of women in the Church, devoted to the support of the missions of the Church at home and overseas by both money and goods."
The early minutes provide the names of those present and reference to barrels of clothing and food, apparently including bottles of preserves that were sent to the Shingwauk Mission. Copies of the letters received from the mission workers in reply and included in the minutes could provide a history of that work. By 1898 we find reference as well to the Japan Medical Mission and a barrel being sent to Salt Spring Island, B.C.
There is little information about the activities of the meetings in Niagara other than the names of those present and regular reports of preparing clothes and packing barrels. Although reports were received from time to time such as those of the Recording and Dorcas Secretaries or that of the delegates to the annual meeting in Hamilton both of which were "very full and interesting", there was no indication of the content of the reports.
The purpose of the group was clearly to be an auxiliary to the mission interests of the Church and originally seen primarily as meeting for work, just as the predecessor Ladies Sewing Party had been. In 1898 they decided that one meeting a month should be a devotional meeting. They also expressed their thanks to the King's Daughters for completing the quilt for their mission activity.
Whether or not because some problems arose among them, they passed a few regulations such as a fine of ten cents "for asking where any garment or material comes from or who has done any work or in any way hurting the feelings of any member" and "no member to use the term high and low church or hold any religious controversy."

source : "St. Mark's Persons of Hopeful Piety" by F. Habermehl and D. Combe (pages 88-91)
Inscriptions:
Reverse:
"Shingwauk Home with its family & the winter's provisions hanging outside"
Image Dimensions:
Image Width: 9.2cm
Image Height: 13.7cm
Subject(s):
Personal Name(s):
Wilson, Edward Francis, Reverend (1844-1915)
Local identifier:
SMC00025
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    fltLatitude: 46.51677
    Latitude: 46.51677 Longitude: -84.33325
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Location of Original:
St. Mark's Anglican Church
41 Byron St.
Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0
Contact
Niagara-on-the-Lake Public Library
Email
Website
Agency street/mail address

10 Anderson Lane P.O. Box 430
Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0
905-468-2023

Shingwauk Home with its family
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Shingwauk Home with its family


Sepia coloured photograph of Indian boys and girls, standing on the ground, the stairs and the ladders, taken outside of a big stone building.

The Rev. Edward Francis Wilson was a missionary among the Indians (Shingwauk mission) and a principal of residential school at Garden River, near Sault Ste. Marie, between 1872 and 1893.