Ancient Toll House moved to new location on fruit farm


Description
Full Text

One of the old landmarks of historic Queenston was moved on Thursday. When the first Queenston Lewiston Bridge was formally opened on March 18, 1851, this building was the toll house. On April 16, 1864, the bridge was blown down and the cables hung for many years. When the International Railway Co., acquired and consolidated all electric lines on the Frontier except the Gorge Railway in the late 90's, it also acquired the Upper Suspension Bridge near Niagara Falls and moved it to Queenston in 1898 and it was erected on the site of the old bridge. A new toll office was erected at the immediate end of the bridge.

In the old toll house lived Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Winn and there were born three sons and three daughters; Mr. and Mrs. Winn also had the Queenston Post Office. One of the older residents of the village states it was on the lower corner of the Winn property.

Miss Winnie Winn, the youngest member of the family, if living today would be close to eighty years old. She died some ten years ago. Her brother Elliot Winn continued to reside in the home till his death about two years ago.

The house being on crown property is controlled by the Parks Commission and it was from the commission that Walter H. Sheppard acquired the building this spring. It was moved to his farm on Line 6 off the Niagara Parkway, a distance of about two miles.

Since Charles Bradley father of the late Horace Bradley is believed to be the last person to drive his team over the first bridge before it fell, he was probably the last person to pay his toll at the old Toll House.


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Description:
Article about old tollhouse in Queenston, built in
1851 for the first Queenston-Lewiston Suspension bridge. The bridge linked Niagara with upper New York State for 14 years and then, on April 12, 1864, the structure was swept down the Niagara River, where it hung useless for 34 years. When the second suspension bridge was completed in July, 1899, a new toll office was erected at the end of the bridge.
For years the two-storey old toll house was occupied by Timothy Winn and his family, then later moved to a farm of Walter H. Sheppard.
Notes:
handwritten note:
"Queenton historic houses.
Toll house now relocated corner Line 6 & Niagara Parkway"
Date Of Event:
1851
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
QC00488-124
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.16682 Longitude: -79.04957
Donor:
Huggins, Jean A. E. (1895-1989)
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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Niagara-on-the-Lake Public Library
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10 Anderson Lane P.O. Box 430
Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0
905-468-2023
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Ancient Toll House moved to new location on fruit farm


Article about old tollhouse in Queenston, built in
1851 for the first Queenston-Lewiston Suspension bridge. The bridge linked Niagara with upper New York State for 14 years and then, on April 12, 1864, the structure was swept down the Niagara River, where it hung useless for 34 years. When the second suspension bridge was completed in July, 1899, a new toll office was erected at the end of the bridge.
For years the two-storey old toll house was occupied by Timothy Winn and his family, then later moved to a farm of Walter H. Sheppard.