Fairview Fruit Farm in Queenston


Description
Full Text

FAIRVIEW FRUIT FARM.

LOCATION:

In the village of Queenston and parts of lots 4 and 5 in the Township of Niagara, County of Lincoln, lies just at the foot of the Mountain at Queenston Heights and is part of the historic Battlefield of that name fought and won by the British in 1812 in which Maj. Gen. Sir Isaac Brock lost his life.

SIZE & SHAPE:

In shape rectangular, the S.E. corner being intersected by the International Railway from Queenston to Niagara Falls, contains 42 1/2 acres with 38 acres all planted and all in bearing except where trees have been removed and young stock replaced amounting all told to perhaps four acres these being planted 1911, and 1912. Balance of land is occupied by a house and barns, and about two acres hillside pasture.

BOUNDARIES:

On the south by the Queenston & Grimsby Stone Road (one of the finest macadam roads in province), on the East by one of the streets of Queenston, on the North by the farm lands of Mrs. Julia Dee, and on the West by the Fruit Farm of H. C. Bradley.

PROFILE:

As seen by the profile all the farm has a good slope to the North and drains naturally and is all plowed and cultivated. The knoll on the South frosting on the Queenston & Grimsby Stone Road afford an uninterrupted view of Queenston, Lewiston and the lower Niagara River and would make splendid building lots.

FENCES:

Fenced well on both South and East with Patent woven Picket and wire, on the North a Patent Woven Wire fence almost new. On the West a deep ditch divides from the next farm. Pasture and railroad are well fenced.

DRAINAGE:

IS WELL secured by four good ditches running from East, to West as shown on the profile, one being the road ditch on the South, one at the foot of the hillside, one between upper and lower orchards and one at North of farm. The dividing Ditch on the Vest carries the Water away, and besides through the upper orchards they are for a large part undertrained with 4" laid tile drains.

SOIL:

Black, clay loam, friable, and strong, some parts sand, in good condition, just the soil for fruit growing, and vegetables, has been well fertilized and has been kept set to fruit and bearing good crops for 15 years, and has never experienced a crop failure. The stones and boulders are all cleaned off, and there is no wasteland on the farm, and as the name Fairview implies it is a fair view to look upon as it has-been kept entirely free from weeds , and is the admiration of thousands of tourists passing through Queenston each year.

BUILDINGS:

HOUSE: One 1 1/2 storey Frame six rooms, kitchen attached, and good cellar, newly painted in good repair occupied by hired man.

BARNS:

Horse barn about 30' x 40' frame hip roofed, in good repair and well painted, built only a few years, stabling 4 horses.

Shed attached about 20 x 30 stabling for 2 horses and box stall, mow over all.

Cow stable and piggery attached about 20' x 20' in good repair and painted.

DRIVE BARN:

Large frame building, formerly a Power House newly erected, with a new Brantford roof, size 32'x 8O' driving doors at either end affording shelter for all implements and vehicles and storage for all baskets hay or straw in bales, etc to the extent of several carloads would make a splendid packing house.

ORCHARDS:

All trees have been replaced that were taken out from time to time so that all the orchards have their full complement of trees, none are missing, and there has not been a year in the last ten when the net proceeds have been less, than $2000.00 and from that to $4000.00. This sureness of crop is due to the slope of the land and the protecting shelter of the 200’ mountain immediately South of farm. Many farms in this immediate neighborhood this year have had their peach prospects ruined by heavy winter frosts, but Fairview farm and a few others similarly situated are loaded with bloom and fruit.

Trees are all planted in absolutely straight lines and angles and cultivation with a team can be done easily in four different ways this is done, and eliminates expensive hand labor. Rows of trees run from North to South each containing 100 trees planted standard distances apart.

About 38 acres are set to trees and vines of the very choices and best paying varieties, and ensuring a following crop, easily harvested, and of different sorts,containing trees and vines as follows very nearly.

PEACHES:

Yellow St. John 200 trees

Jakes Rare Ripe 25

Elbertas 300

Reeves Favorite 200

New Prolific 100

Smocks 50

Crawfords & Early 75

Total:950

PEARS

Bartletts 800 trees

Dutchess 300

Keiffer 250

Buerre ae Anjou 100

Louise Bond 50

Other Var'ts. 100

Total: 1600

PLUMS & PRUNES:

Green Gage 300 trees

Reine Claude 300

Imp. Yell Gage 100

Lowrey Gage 250

Niagaras 400

Washingtons 100

Lombards 250

Other var. 100

[Prunes]

German 100

Italian 350

Japan 200

GRAPES:

About 5 acres equally divided Red, White, and Blue standard varieties full bearing about 2500 vines, well wired, and with good posts trimmed, and tied, wires tightened, and posts reset this spring.

QUINCES:

About 100 Orange Quinces full bearing, good condition.

CHERRIES:

About 150 Early Richmond Sour about 100 one year old, balance full bearing. Some few Sweet Cherries, white Ox hearts, and Black.

SPRING WATER:

There are two constant springs on the farm, one is piped to barnyard, water is excellent.

HELP REQUIRED:

Two men with one team will do all the work required from Nov. 15th to July 15th except spraying an during the balance of year being picking season the amount of help required varying from five to twenty men and another team, depending on the crop and how it ripens.

PRODUCTION

(in 11 qt baskets)

1910:

Strawberries 00 Cherries 35 Apples 324 Peaches 1536 Pears 1736 Plums & Prunes 6361 Quinces 272 Grapes (6 qtn) 2379

Total Baskets of good Fruit Marketed: 12,643

1911:

Strawberries 8 Cherries 30 Apples 00 Peaches 11862 Pears 1603 Plums & Prunes 7412 Quinces 101 Grapes (6 qtn) 2814

Total Baskets of good Fruit Marketed: 13,830

Net cash returns $4042.29

(Exact figures for 1910 not available)

PRICES & TERMS:

Owner will not accept for the above property described less than $16,000.00 and $10,000.00 of which must be cash and mortgage can be arranged for balance. There are a lot of chattels on the farm, which will be offered for sale at reasonable rates.

LOTS "A" described and located on sketch will be sold together with Stone residence, and Stone Packing house, and Ice house, if the purchaser desires this with farm, reserving a building let out of same, for the sum of $4,000.00 net of which $2,000.00 must be cash.

BEAUTIFUL SURRONDINGS

Just across the Stone road on the south of the farm is the famous Queenston Height Park which extends from there to top of mountain, and includes the beautiful park on the heights, an all the surrounding battleground where the gallant Hen. Brock sacrificed his life in driving back the invading enemy on Oct 13th, 1812. This park is under Provincial control and is one of the finest it country and the view from the Monument is nor surpassed by the famous "Valley of the Nile" in Colorado and is visited each year by thousands of tourists. This Park and mountainside wooded with Cedar and monument at the summit rake a handsome picture as viewed from any part of the farm, while looking North from the elevation at the South of Farm the village of Queenston, town of Lewiston, and the American side of the River and the beautiful lower Niagara River, all lies in a panorama before the eye.

TRAVELLING FACILITIES:

Residents of Queenston have quick and easy access to all nearby towns and cities and are closer than most places to a good many cities and can reach them by three lines of trolleys, by three steam roads, and by boat all with in easy reach. Queenston to Niagara Falls, 30 min., Lewiston 10 min., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 35 min., St. Catharines, 40 min., Buffalo or Hamilton, 1 1/2 hrs, and Toronto or Rochester 2 1/2 hrs.

This should be a favorite property for a business man to own as it is right in town, and he could get back and forth from the cities easily for the week end. The roads here are better than the average and afford a real pleasure in motoring or driving and there are a hundred points of interest within a radius of 15 miles.

SKETCH:

A pencil sketch of the Farm and its proximity to Queenston, and river, and mountain has been prepared and will be forwarded on request. Also photos of buildings and orchards if wanted.

LOTS MARKED "A"

Lots marked on Sketch as "A" are also for sale with the farm as the seller now uses the large Stone Residence himself and also the stone Packing House and would sell if purchaser of farm wished these buildings. The ground is about 5 acres in extent and is sold as building lots, at lot prices on which is erected the following buildings.

STONE RESIDENCE:

About 30' x 40' with double verandah

A 2 1/2 story Stone house, new Frame kitchen attached, good cellar, large new cistern, wash room, coal bins, pantrys, closets, etc all newly repaired, and decorated, and in excellent repair, good well at house, and kitchen opens out into Packing house.

STONE PACKING HOUSE

Adjoining residence in good repair, size 54' x 80' with basement under all, and built with Feed bins all along one side, used as a packing house for fruit, storage, and vehicles.

This house and Packing house are on the main streets of Queenston, and directly on the Electric car line, and opposite the station, and between the farm and the wharf.

ICE HOUSE:

There is a good Ice House attached to the Packing house, of frame size 16' x 16' with a triple wall and double roof.

HOW TO GET THERE:

From Toronto take any Boat on the N. H. CO. line to Queenston and ask for Fairview Fruit Farm.

REASONS FOR SELLING:

On account of the owner being engaged in too much other business and being unable to look after it. This farm is one of the finest to be had in the fruit Belt, and has always been a producer, and a money maker, and been operated by one of the pioneer Fruit Growers in the Peninsula, and is only sacrificed under these conditions. The prospects for a heavy crop and this kind of farm must needs have a substantial deposit in cash and these terms are very reasonable considering that land 3 miles from any station or village is bringing $225.00 per acre and other farms from that up to $500.00 per acre and none of them located as this one is.

You will do well to investigate this thoroughly, and we will be glad to back up any of the above statements, and be pleased to show any intending purchasers over the property.


Media Type:
Text
Item Types:
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Description:
Complete 4 page document describing in detail the Fairview Fruit Farm, offered for sale in 1912 by the owner, Matthew Charles Lowrey. By this date Lowrey's interests had diversified - he had, for example opened another store and was involved in the Queenston/St. Davids Quarry - leaving too little time to devote to the farm. In the 1912 document, the house is described as a 1 ½ storey frame building with 6 rooms, an attached kitchen and a good cellar, all newly painted and in good repair and occupied by the hired man. Asking price for house and land was $16000 - $10000 cash and balance if necessary by mortgage. Also offered for sale were the land and buildings on Queen at Kent, plus several village lots. No sale of the property occurred in 1912, and Lowrey remained involved in the property through the 1920s.
Notes:
Matthew Charles Lowrey bought 42 acres of Niagara Township lot 4 in 1888 and established a successful fruit growing operation known as Fairview Fruit Farm on this land. Fruit farming became profitable in the 1880s, largely because railways had opened up new markets and tax records show that his 12 acre orchard in 1891 grew to 42 acres in 1899.
After the death of Charles M.(1931) and his second wife (1933), his three daughters formed a short-lived partnership to operate Fairview Farm (1935-1938). Luella, one of the daughters and her husband, Thomas H. Clifford then ran the business until 1969.
Inscriptions:
"Fairview Farm Queenston"
Date of Publication:
1912
Image Dimensions:
Image Width: 13.8cm
Image Height: 8cm
Subject(s):
Personal Name(s):
Lowrey, Charles Matthew (1855-1931)
Local identifier:
NOTLPL00243
Collection:
Collection of Alan Clifford
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.165063 Longitude: -79.05769
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
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10 Anderson Lane P.O. Box 430
Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0
905-468-2023
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Fairview Fruit Farm in Queenston


Complete 4 page document describing in detail the Fairview Fruit Farm, offered for sale in 1912 by the owner, Matthew Charles Lowrey. By this date Lowrey's interests had diversified - he had, for example opened another store and was involved in the Queenston/St. Davids Quarry - leaving too little time to devote to the farm. In the 1912 document, the house is described as a 1 ½ storey frame building with 6 rooms, an attached kitchen and a good cellar, all newly painted and in good repair and occupied by the hired man. Asking price for house and land was $16000 - $10000 cash and balance if necessary by mortgage. Also offered for sale were the land and buildings on Queen at Kent, plus several village lots. No sale of the property occurred in 1912, and Lowrey remained involved in the property through the 1920s.