Holodomor Digital Collections
Large crowd of people waiting outside a Khatorh for black bread
Description
Creator
Wienerberger, Alexander, 1891-1955, Photographer
Media Type
Image
Text
Item Types
Photographs
Pamphlet illustrations
Description
Hundreds of people are crowded around the front and to the side of what the photographer indicates is a place to get bread. The entrance to the store is just to the left of the white building, and above the door is a temporary sign that reads “Хаторг”. (For a very similar photo taken shortly after this one that has better resolution on the sign: see PD3: http://vitacollections.ca/HREC-holodomorphotodirectory/3636354/data ). Historians say that this location is at the intersection of the street once called Sverdlova /Свердлова (now Poltavsʹkyy Shlyakh /Полтавський Шлях) and Rylyeyeva /Рилєєва.


A “Хаторг" or Khatorh (abbreviation of: Kharkiv Trade Organization) was one of several types of food access centers created or repurposed in the early 1930s to manage the sharply diminishing food supply for the greatly expanded urban and industrial population. This establishment is most likely selling goods for residents with ration cards; however, it is possible that it had been repurposed in 1933 to sell bread for rubles (Wienerberger, Osokina) (more details in "Context note" at right).

At this Khatorh, the door appears to be open, but the large waiting crowd is an indication that supply and delivery is not meeting the demand for the basic necessities that can be obtained here.

For further information on: Availability and access to food in urban and industrial areas, see "Context Note" under Related Features at right.

Notes
Photo source: Russland wie es wirklich ist! Wien: Vaterländische Front. 1934, p.10.

For further details and a full list of original versions and those published through 1939, with captions, see Related Features on the right.
Inscriptions
"Schlange stehen um Schwarzbrot." [Waiting in line for black bread.]
Date of Original
spring-summer 1933
Subject(s)
Local identifier
PD100
Collection
Alexander Wienerberger: Beyond the Innitzer album
Language of Item
German
Geographic Coverage
  • Kharkiv, Ukraine
    Latitude: 49.98081 Longitude: 36.25272
Copyright Statement
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Copyright Holder
Samara Pearce https://www.samarapearce.com/
Recommended Citation
Wienerberger, Alexander. "Schlange stehen um Schwartzbrot." Russland wie es wirklich ist! Wien: Vaterländische Front. 1934, p.10. Retrieved from: http://vitacollections.ca/HREC-holodomorphotodirectory/3636347/data
Location of Original
Location of original photograph reproduced in this pamphlet is unknown.
Terms of Use
Rightsholder requests that the name of the photographer, Alexander Wienerberger, accompany each authentic reproduction of his work.
Reproduction Notes
Reproduced with the permission of rightsholder Samara Pearce. Source: Pamphlet cited in NOTES above.
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Large crowd of people waiting outside a Khatorh for black bread


Hundreds of people are crowded around the front and to the side of what the photographer indicates is a place to get bread. The entrance to the store is just to the left of the white building, and above the door is a temporary sign that reads “Хаторг”. (For a very similar photo taken shortly after this one that has better resolution on the sign: see PD3: http://vitacollections.ca/HREC-holodomorphotodirectory/3636354/data ). Historians say that this location is at the intersection of the street once called Sverdlova /Свердлова (now Poltavsʹkyy Shlyakh /Полтавський Шлях) and Rylyeyeva /Рилєєва.


A “Хаторг" or Khatorh (abbreviation of: Kharkiv Trade Organization) was one of several types of food access centers created or repurposed in the early 1930s to manage the sharply diminishing food supply for the greatly expanded urban and industrial population. This establishment is most likely selling goods for residents with ration cards; however, it is possible that it had been repurposed in 1933 to sell bread for rubles (Wienerberger, Osokina) (more details in "Context note" at right).

At this Khatorh, the door appears to be open, but the large waiting crowd is an indication that supply and delivery is not meeting the demand for the basic necessities that can be obtained here.

For further information on: Availability and access to food in urban and industrial areas, see "Context Note" under Related Features at right.