Holodomor Digital Collections
Parasotka, Stepan
:
Description
Creators
Stepan Parasotka (d. b. unknown), Author
Volodymyr Maniak
, Recipient
Media Type
Text
Item Types
Correspondence
Envelopes
Translations
Transcriptions
Description

Letter sent from: Dolynska raion, Kirovohrad oblast
Letter describes events in 1932-1933 in: Novomoskovs'k Machine-Tractor Station (MTS), Novomoskovs'k raion, Dnipropetrovsk oblast
Current location name: Novomoskovs'k raion, Dnipropetrovsk oblast


Stepan Parasotka was assistant to the chief of the political department of Novomoskovsk Machine-Tractor Station in charge of the Komsomol from March 1933. He was an eyewitness to numerous deaths from hunger and cannibalism and the devastation in villages. He is defensive about collectivization and collective farms.


He does not blame Stalin but rather accuses the Ukrainian leadership (Kosior, Postyshev, Chubar, Liubchenko and others) because they were struggling for power. He notes that there was no famine in oblasts of other republics bordering Ukraine.


By June 1933, the famine was alleviated by the new harvest of greens and vegetables. Parasotka says that the harvest had never been as good as in 1933, not since 1923, and that the collective farmers were receiving generous workday payment in grain; they were amply rewarded for their work with grain from the 1933 harvest and therefore accepted the superiority of collective farms. Villages completely recovered by the end of 1933. The author, in sum, is a believer in the value of collective farms.


Parasotka believes that the Soviet regime is pushing a new narrative about the Famine that is a “one-sided new cult of personality” and that therefore his letter will not be published. He is a veteran of party, World War II and labour.


Russian transcription and English translation available.

Notes
Author's gender: Male
Category: Apologist
Author's name in Ukrainian: Степан Афанасійович Парасотка
Date of Original
January 10, 1989
Date Of Event
1932-1933
Subject(s)
Personal Name(s)
Степан Афанасійович Парасотка ; Stepan Parasotka
Local identifier
122 - 3b
Collection
Maniak Letters
Language of Item
English; Russian
Geographic Coverage
  • Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine
    Latitude: 48.63799 Longitude: 35.24548
Copyright Statement
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation
Holodomor Research & Education Consortium
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.

thumbnail








Parasotka, Stepan



Letter sent from: Dolynska raion, Kirovohrad oblast
Letter describes events in 1932-1933 in: Novomoskovs'k Machine-Tractor Station (MTS), Novomoskovs'k raion, Dnipropetrovsk oblast
Current location name: Novomoskovs'k raion, Dnipropetrovsk oblast


Stepan Parasotka was assistant to the chief of the political department of Novomoskovsk Machine-Tractor Station in charge of the Komsomol from March 1933. He was an eyewitness to numerous deaths from hunger and cannibalism and the devastation in villages. He is defensive about collectivization and collective farms.


He does not blame Stalin but rather accuses the Ukrainian leadership (Kosior, Postyshev, Chubar, Liubchenko and others) because they were struggling for power. He notes that there was no famine in oblasts of other republics bordering Ukraine.


By June 1933, the famine was alleviated by the new harvest of greens and vegetables. Parasotka says that the harvest had never been as good as in 1933, not since 1923, and that the collective farmers were receiving generous workday payment in grain; they were amply rewarded for their work with grain from the 1933 harvest and therefore accepted the superiority of collective farms. Villages completely recovered by the end of 1933. The author, in sum, is a believer in the value of collective farms.


Parasotka believes that the Soviet regime is pushing a new narrative about the Famine that is a “one-sided new cult of personality” and that therefore his letter will not be published. He is a veteran of party, World War II and labour.


Russian transcription and English translation available.