Holodomor Digital Collections
Neporozhnii, A.A., Olha Petrenko, Dominika Shcherbak
:
Description
Creators
A. A. Neporozhnii, Author
Volodymyr Maniak
, Recipient
Olha Kyrylivna Petrenko (b. 1905)
, Witness
Dominika Shcherbak (b. 1903)
, Witness
Media Type
Text
Item Types
Correspondence
Envelopes
Transcriptions
Translations
Description

Letter sent from: Village of Demiantsi, Pereiaslav-Khmelnytskyi raion, Kyiv oblast
Letter describes events in (1932-1933): Village of Demiantsi, Pereiaslav-Khmelnytskyi raion, Kyiv oblast
Current location name: Village of Demiantsi, Pereiaslav-Khmelnytskyi raion, Kyiv oblast

The letter describes events experienced by Olha Kyrylivna Petrenko (Ольга Кирилівна Петренко), born in 1903, and Dominika Shcherbak (Домініка Щербак), born in 1905 (the author's grandmothers).

Olha Petrenko (b. 1905): - those who were in the collective farm survived the famine because they received at least some food, like a cup of flour, at work; a teacher from the city who was sent to oversee the grain collection was "smart": he collected only what was required by the plan, not more, because he pitied the people; attempts by people to go to Russia to trade their valuables for foodstuffs (and the peril this involved); people consumed food substitutes – they caught and ate cats, dogs, rats, frogs and larvae; 600 people died in their village; they were buried in shallow graves without coffins.

Dominika (Domakha) Shcherbak (b. 1903): - family survived because her grandfather worked on a collective farm and received a higher workday ration; incidents of cannibalism in their village; a couple that ate their child was sent to Siberia and never returned. Villagers almost killed them when they learned about it.
The author notes that evidence of mass deaths during the famine are the numerous smaller graves without crosses at the cemetery. His grandfather said that it was even worse in villages in the South of Ukraine where whole villages died out (he visited there).
Notes
Author's gender: Male
Author's occupation: History teacher
Eyewitnesses' genders: Female
Author's name in Ukrainian: A. A. Непорожній;
Witnesses' names in Ukrainian: Ольга Кирилівна Петренко, Домініка Щербак
Date of Original
January 17, 1989
Date Of Event
1932-1933
Subject(s)
Personal Name(s)
A. A. Непорожній ; Ольга Кирилівна Петренко ; Домініка Щербак ; A. A. Neporozhnii ; Olha Petrenko ; Dominika Shcherbak
Local identifier
192 - Dropbox 4
Collection
The Maniak Collection
Language of Item
English; Ukrainian
Geographic Coverage
Copyright Statement
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation
Holodomor Research & Education Consortium
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Neporozhnii, A.A., Olha Petrenko, Dominika Shcherbak



Letter sent from: Village of Demiantsi, Pereiaslav-Khmelnytskyi raion, Kyiv oblast
Letter describes events in (1932-1933): Village of Demiantsi, Pereiaslav-Khmelnytskyi raion, Kyiv oblast
Current location name: Village of Demiantsi, Pereiaslav-Khmelnytskyi raion, Kyiv oblast

The letter describes events experienced by Olha Kyrylivna Petrenko (Ольга Кирилівна Петренко), born in 1903, and Dominika Shcherbak (Домініка Щербак), born in 1905 (the author's grandmothers).

Olha Petrenko (b. 1905): - those who were in the collective farm survived the famine because they received at least some food, like a cup of flour, at work; a teacher from the city who was sent to oversee the grain collection was "smart": he collected only what was required by the plan, not more, because he pitied the people; attempts by people to go to Russia to trade their valuables for foodstuffs (and the peril this involved); people consumed food substitutes – they caught and ate cats, dogs, rats, frogs and larvae; 600 people died in their village; they were buried in shallow graves without coffins.

Dominika (Domakha) Shcherbak (b. 1903): - family survived because her grandfather worked on a collective farm and received a higher workday ration; incidents of cannibalism in their village; a couple that ate their child was sent to Siberia and never returned. Villagers almost killed them when they learned about it.
The author notes that evidence of mass deaths during the famine are the numerous smaller graves without crosses at the cemetery. His grandfather said that it was even worse in villages in the South of Ukraine where whole villages died out (he visited there).