Cramahe Archives Digital Collection
Basket
Description
Media Type
Image
Object
Description
A black ash splint woven basket, likely from Alderville First Nation or Mohawks of Quinte Bay, Tyendinaga, which was used for harvesting apples in Colborne. The basketweaver used wide and narrow splints to create a sturdy basket which was capable of holding a heavy load of apples. A leather strap, possibly once a part of a bridle, and a hook was attached around the handle for suspension while harvesting. The hook was made in the Wallace Rueben Scott's foundry.
Notes
The basket is in a private collection.

See the publication - How Firm a Foundation: A History of the Township of Cramahe and the Village of Colborne in Cramahe's Digital Archives (3bk), pp.148-149 for a reference to the family and Chapter 15 for a history of the apple industry in Cramahe.
Subject(s)
Local identifier
46ar
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 44.00012 Longitude: -77.8828
Copyright Statement
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Copyright Holder
Copyright, public domain: Cramahe Township Public Library owns the rights to the archival copy of the digital image.
Contact
Cramahe Township Public Library
Email:cramlib@cramahetownship.ca
Website:
Agency street/mail address:
6 King Street West
PO Box 190
Colborne, ON K0K 1S0
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Basket


A black ash splint woven basket, likely from Alderville First Nation or Mohawks of Quinte Bay, Tyendinaga, which was used for harvesting apples in Colborne. The basketweaver used wide and narrow splints to create a sturdy basket which was capable of holding a heavy load of apples. A leather strap, possibly once a part of a bridle, and a hook was attached around the handle for suspension while harvesting. The hook was made in the Wallace Rueben Scott's foundry.