Cramahe Archives Digital Collection
Good Friends: Photographs of Cramahe Pets and Farm Animals
At Work - On the Farm
Henry Scott and an unidentified man driving Barney and Bob
Henry Scott and an unidentified man driving Barney and Bob Details
Lawrence Mutton farm, Shiloh
Lawrence Mutton farm, Shiloh Details
Old Tim with Cliff and Edmund Quinn in the publication, Down on the Farm by Cliff Quinn
Old Tim with Cliff and Edmund Quinn in the publication, Down on the Farm by Cliff Quinn Details
Photograph of man working the field with two horses
Photograph of man working the field with two horses Details
Cliff Quinn's memories of animals on the farm - "After we moved to our new farm, we had Mollie, Dan and Darkey, (a beautiful black team, big and strong). After these came Maud and Tip and Harry. Then old Min, who gave birth to Bessie. Mollie was the mother of Tim and Jim. They were like two tractors but at times they would be frightened of some simple thing. Away they'd go and scatter machinery all over the field. Maud and Tip were our driving and riding horses. Tip would take his time going away from home but when he headed for home, it was hard to hold him at all. He was a good driving horse who would never let another horse pass if he could stay ahead." ... "1920's My Dad sold Dan and Darkey for a fancy price but we were sure sorry to see them go. Mollie, Maud and Tim are buried on the hill. I remember if you were foolish enough to climb in Maud's manger, she'd get mad, seize you by the seat of your pants and heave you out. Jim lived to a ripe old age. He got to be real smart skidding horse out at Burnley Woods. ... When we finished, Dad just took him to the gate out there and said, "go home Jim." We were all amazed but he arrived home, 10 miles, the next day. He just ambled along at his own speed, stopping to eat a choice bunch of grass whenever he felt like it." "Most of our cows had names. They were big Holsteins and when they freshened you had to milk some of them from both sides. I can only remember two names, Horns and Scarety (because she was nervous). In summer it was our job to take the cows to pasture down the road to our other farm before going to school. Bring them back again after school. On Saturdays, our task would be to let them pasture on the main roadside or up the sideroad. As long as they ate we had to keep them there, but when they got full and started lying down, we'd put them in a field. We always thought they were going to eat all day and we'd never get away from that job."
Harrison George’s Grist Mill, Morganston
Harrison George’s Grist Mill, Morganston Details
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit