Muskoka Digital Archives
Huntsville Oral Histories - Interview with Don Nickalls
Description
Creators
Don Nickalls, Interviewee
Wayne Cooper
, Photographer
Media Type
Video
Item Type
Video recordings
Description
Wayne Cooper interviews long time resident Don Nickalls
Date of Original
September 2015
Date Of Event
September 2015
Personal Name(s)
Don Nickalls
Corporate Name(s)
Huntsville Public Library
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 45.33341 Longitude: -79.21632
Copyright Statement
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact:
Huntsville Public Library
 Cortney.LeGros@huntsvillelibrary.ca
 
 

7 Minerva St. E.

Huntsville, ON P1H 1W4

Transcription

00:00

this is Wayne Cooper it is August 12

00:02

2015 I'm interviewing a longtime

00:06

resident of fun so please introduce

00:08

yourself and give us your name birth

00:11

year and birthplace my name is donaill

00:16

do in atl Jack Nichols and I see Kate

00:22

ALS i was born in huntsville on july

00:27

nineteenth nineteen thirty-one tell us a

00:31

little bit about your childhood memories

00:33

parents and home life in particular to

00:36

start with I had a good home life my

00:41

father and mother and I had a sister

00:45

younger four years younger than I and we

00:49

had a good lift we lived on the top of

00:52

mary street and I never when we got our

00:57

first where my father got his first car

01:01

we used to get in every night after

01:04

after dinner and we drive down the West

01:08

End take a trip if we did it I'm sure

01:11

every night that drive home and that was

01:14

our the end of our day to this funny

01:18

Trevor did and we did that for many

01:21

years and then I went to high school up

01:26

public and high school in Huntsville and

01:30

find the after finishing that and my

01:34

mother passed away just as I was

01:36

finishing high school at 39 years old

01:40

she was very young and I was had decided

01:48

that I would like to join the business

01:52

of Wardell business and so I i went to a

01:57

Ryerson in Toronto and I took a course

02:03

called retail merchandising it was a

02:06

two-year course and actually was very

02:11

interesting

02:12

very helpful and the only thing that I

02:15

have regretted of that whole two years

02:18

is that they had a taping course was

02:24

included in this course and I thought I

02:28

don't need to know how to type we've got

02:31

three girls in the office they they can

02:33

read all the letters and do all the

02:35

taping I wish I hadn't said that are

02:39

done that but I go to a movie during the

02:42

type of course let's go back and we bet

02:46

to your earliest memory of a trip to

02:49

Toronto remember the purpose of that

02:51

trip well yes we had relatives in

02:53

Toronto the lived in Toronto and we used

02:58

to go down at least once a year our

03:00

family my father's guard and we leave

03:06

here first thing in the morning

03:07

properties seven or eight o'clock in the

03:09

morning and we drive to your way yeah

03:11

that was lunch time by the time we got

03:14

to Orillia we have lunch and then we go

03:18

on back in the car drive down go through

03:22

barrier around Barry and when we got to

03:27

just north of Toronto we'd start looking

03:31

watching who could see the first street

03:34

car because in those days the streetcar

03:38

did come up I'm not sure how quite how

03:41

far but not not anywhere near Barry so

03:44

we'd watch for our first street car that

03:46

was a big thing then we drive down if we

03:49

go through the parts of Toronto and till

03:52

we got to our relatives home and we'd

03:55

stay there for probably a week and have

03:58

a nice visit and do different things and

04:01

maybe do a little shopping and so on and

04:04

it was kind of a yearly thing we did

04:07

this for for many years and I guess we

04:11

outgrew it or my parents are good and

04:13

that was no longer but

04:16

so it was it was interested in different

04:19

it was nice to go because there were

04:22

many many people who lived in Huntsville

04:25

that haven't been passed bracebridge

04:27

they try to where's that you know never

04:30

heard of it when I got involved in the

04:34

business we would take some of our staff

04:38

and we'd go down to uh to the Royal York

04:40

Hotel and and they would put on up the

04:45

companies that we dealt with what rent

04:49

rooms and they put on displays and then

04:51

we can could own a buy for our spring

04:54

and summer business and then the later

04:57

on we got on for the fall and winter

04:59

business and one people when we'd say

05:03

we're from Huntsville they'd say my

05:06

goodness how long did it take to get

05:09

here you know they thought Huntsville

05:11

was up on the article thing but yeah it

05:15

was it was going to experience and we

05:17

did this for many many years and then

05:21

well after i was married my wife Pat

05:25

became very involved in the business

05:28

fact she and I ended up owning and

05:32

running it for several years until we

05:35

decided that we would had enough and in

05:39

the 1980s we closed the business at a

05:43

big sale we had an auction and we had a

05:46

lot of I guess you'd call him antique

05:50

furnishings and so on which went on the

05:53

auction and it was very interested if we

05:56

cleaned it right out too but when we got

05:59

finished we had one small rock with

06:02

about three lady addresses on it and

06:04

that was the end of war dells so was it

06:07

was quite quite interesting a lot of

06:11

interesting people we dealt with them

06:14

and a lot of people that would come in

06:18

to visit my uncle Claude Wardell when he

06:22

was involved in the business and they

06:25

come in to borrow money from and

06:28

out he take them back to our office and

06:31

he get a piece of paper and it might be

06:34

over maybe fifty cents maybe at the most

06:37

a dollar and he'd insist that these

06:39

people sign an IOU for that whatever

06:43

your mom was and then that went on with

06:47

my father he did the same thing and then

06:50

it was my turn and I did the same thing

06:53

for many many years and we had up a chap

06:56

that I'd like to mention his name

06:58

because that name is still in Huntsville

07:01

his name was Russell ward and he worked

07:05

in the lumber camps back up in nero

07:08

oakland park and he'd he'd come in in

07:14

the summertime actually or when he when

07:17

he retired after many years he came in

07:21

and he'd come to be in see dawn I'd uh I

07:25

need a little money so I'd loan him in

07:29

those days I would be big money I loaned

07:31

him fifteen dollars and he said I'll be

07:34

back my pension check comes in on the

07:37

middle September I'll come back and pay

07:40

and he never ever missed a payment for

07:43

many many years and you know so one he

07:48

passed away one of the ward family I

07:51

can't recall it was follow me to see of

07:55

Russell old as any money didn't know a

07:59

thing paid it every every time he paid

08:02

one time he got the money and it was a

08:06

enormous day there was at a big parade

08:09

and he was involved in the parade and I

08:14

think he's had a few drinks and and he

08:17

came in and got the fifteen dollars in

08:20

he came back about an hour later he was

08:23

quite upset Donny says I've got a

08:26

problem he said I've lost my money he

08:30

said i think what i did when i went to

08:33

put it in my pocket I I missed my pocket

08:36

and now he said I'm really in trouble to

08:40

think you could

08:41

we have some more so I said sure Russ no

08:44

problems I gave him another fifteen

08:46

dollars what she signed for and he was

08:50

back on that one of his old age pension

08:53

check and he paid back the thirty

08:54

dollars this time instead of the 15 and

08:58

we had a lot of people the customers

09:00

like that over the years that would

09:03

always have to have a little extra money

09:06

and in those days you know 50 Cent's was

09:11

a lot of money and these fellows used to

09:14

not all of them but some of them what

09:18

one is littless fifty cents then they

09:21

could get over to the liquor store and

09:23

buy a bottle of wine pretty good wine

09:25

for fifty cents a bottle a little more

09:29

than that now so anyway we be carried on

09:35

with the business my wife that I and she

09:40

had rheumatoid arthritis and she became

09:44

very she could hardly walk in your hands

09:47

she couldn't use that well so we decided

09:51

that we closed the store this is in the

09:54

1980s so the store was the business is

09:58

almost honored years old at this point

10:00

so we put a big sign every februari we

10:04

used to have a big sale and we give the

10:10

first ten customers become a dollar bill

10:13

or some always gave the first few

10:15

customers goody to get them here and

10:19

we'd have people lined up the whole main

10:21

street waiting to get in because we

10:24

wouldn't open the door wouldn't unlock

10:26

until nine o'clock and we put on a

10:31

frente wake up made up we got quite a

10:34

name for Ward else having their big club

10:37

annual sale and so when we decided to

10:42

close it we did the same thing only we

10:45

put it as a retiree sale instead of just

10:50

our yearly sale and

10:53

uh we closed it and we ended up we had

10:57

an auction at one time I wanted it

11:00

during that we ended up with a rack like

11:06

a rocket clothes rack with probably

11:08

about three dresses on it and we sold

11:11

everything else is gone bordelles was

11:13

gone we sold we had our own hangers war

11:17

delica bordelles the busy merchants

11:20

printed on them they were wooden and we

11:25

got it we just don't have it nothing

11:29

left anymore after that and so what for

11:33

me it was a very interesting and

11:38

valuable part of my life for most of my

11:42

life at that time and when I got

11:46

finished and got everything cleaned up

11:49

we sold the building and no algonquin up

11:54

fitters is in there it has been in there

11:56

for quite some time now and but we still

12:00

have someone I still have some of the

12:02

the old things from more Dells which are

12:06

nice to have my daughter was at nah but

12:11

married for I think 25 years or more and

12:14

has 33 boys two of them finished

12:18

University the other one just starting

12:21

so I guess I I shouldn't say I guess

12:26

I've had a very good life long life I

12:30

just turned 84 years old this past July

12:35

and I have no complaint the only

12:40

complaint I have now is that I can't

12:44

remember things you know if I think

12:46

you're doing very well done I'm going to

12:49

seed your memory on a couple of things

12:50

what are your memories of the war del

12:52

Holm in this film the war del Holm was

12:56

odd located i'm trying to think of the

13:00

name of the street do you remember where

13:01

i am an elm street at west road west

13:05

road west rule

13:07

that was the old Wardell Matthew War

13:10

dolls hold home well it wasn't old then

13:13

I guess but it was his home and we spent

13:18

a lot of time as children in this house

13:21

with we had Christmas there we have

13:24

birthdays there we had free while

13:27

everything even the odd funeral I think

13:29

we had there to over the many years and

13:33

the hope of the home is still there it's

13:36

got to be well over a hundred years old

13:39

or people living in it still and now

13:42

it's at a look quite a bit of upgrades

13:45

so on over the years I haven't been in

13:47

it for many many years but it's it was

13:52

an old Huntsville original I believe I

13:54

think so yeah um you told me earlier

13:58

about a trip to Toronto a special trip

14:00

to Toronto to see the king can you tell

14:03

me more about that yeah we the king and

14:07

queen were about to visit Toronto and we

14:12

had you know we had videos and things

14:14

that we could know what's going on and

14:19

we drove down and which took it's about

14:24

a four or five hour trip to Toronto and

14:27

to visit our relatives to stay with them

14:31

and we had a chance to see the king and

14:33

queen of England which was quite an

14:36

exciting adventure in those days I can't

14:40

remember what year but I was probably

14:42

about maybe in my teens when this

14:45

happened so but I guess I remember um

14:50

your first employment my first

14:54

employment was at war Dells I was 12

14:59

years old and we became a very very

15:03

business busy at Christmastime read

15:06

everybody do the shopping their

15:08

Christmas shopping and so on and we

15:11

didn't have modern cash registers or

15:14

anything so we had we had a

15:19

a metal line that went down to our

15:22

office and we put the customer's bill

15:25

and the customers money in this

15:30

container and pull it pull up but handle

15:35

and it would shoot the money down to the

15:38

office the girls in the office would

15:41

make the change and send it back to us

15:44

and this is how I often feel sorry that

15:48

I didn't keep those things to have you

15:52

know as a memory but I don't I guess we

15:55

were so glad to get rid of them and get

15:57

cash registers what show we're so much

16:00

easier it took us a little while to

16:01

figure out how to work them but it was

16:06

good so you endured the technological

16:08

change yeah um tell me a little bit

16:11

about your your observations of the end

16:15

of the Second World War celebrations in

16:17

Huntsville yeah a second world war i

16:20

think i was about probably 14 at the end

16:24

of the war and of course all of a sudden

16:28

the war was over and everybody was

16:30

celebrating them including the whole

16:34

town hot self and read the main street

16:36

you could hardly move on for people

16:38

celebrating and driving up and down and

16:42

it was really exciting to see that the

16:46

war was over and in Canada and the

16:50

states and so on had won the war so we

16:53

got wicked then get back to normal how

16:56

do the people celebrate down where their

16:58

fireworks serving like that I can't

17:01

recall fireworks I think most of the fun

17:04

I can remember getting on the back of a

17:07

truck with a whole bunch of other people

17:09

and driving up down the main street

17:10

singing and hollering them I don't I

17:14

don't I can't recall fireworks now they

17:18

could have been there may have been but

17:19

that's a long time ago that's the look

17:22

at ya thank you for that done now I know

17:24

that you received your elementary and

17:26

high school education in US

17:28

I'd like you to make comment on some

17:31

memorable teachers classmates special

17:35

events that occurred in the schools

17:36

while you were going there I concede

17:39

your memory Harry Thornton was the

17:41

principal yes any any thoughts and

17:45

memories of Harry in particular Harry

17:48

Thornton was just the first principle

17:51

when I went into high school he was the

17:56

principal and he was quite strict but he

18:01

was a good principle and he ran up good

18:03

school and for many many years until he

18:07

retired and I made a lot of friends over

18:12

not during that time in Huntsville high

18:17

school there are too many of us left

18:20

anymore I had good friends like but Joss

18:25

key I'm trying to think some of the

18:30

others teen jersey on Teen Jersey a no

18:33

Tina I believe still living but passed

18:37

away about a year ago I also have my

18:41

younger cousin bill Nichols who I ended

18:45

up working for in that so funny emails

18:48

after I said we closed our war dells and

18:52

I work for bill for probably 15 or 16

18:57

years I guess and had a good

19:00

relationship there bill and I became

19:02

well I shouldn't say became our our

19:06

fathers were brothers and Bill and i

19:09

were really brothers too we we were we

19:16

were brothers more than than just

19:19

cousins we were first cousins but so we

19:23

had a great time bill unfortunately

19:26

passed away about a year ago and but he

19:30

was younger he was six is six years

19:33

younger than me and I still hanging in

19:37

there well they say about the good dying

19:40

young

19:41

yeah I remember going to the Fall Fair

19:46

every every September being marched over

19:49

to the falls there at the arena grounds

19:52

I was in elementary school do you

19:54

remember that happened doesn't remember

19:56

a 1-up episode that was really I thought

20:00

quite interesting and quite funny this

20:04

would be in September and all the school

20:06

kids would march over to the arena and

20:13

it was quite a big deal I was standing

20:16

out in front of our store with and there

20:19

were two or three Americans standing

20:21

there and they were watching all these

20:24

kids going by and waving and flags and

20:27

having a great time and then one fellow

20:29

looked at the others they said look at

20:31

all those kids my goodness they must

20:35

have a lot of cold nights up here at the

20:37

lawyer indeed that was true yeah um

20:41

backdated to your experiences at Ryerson

20:45

and coming back to huntsville um you

20:48

took retailing what was the what was the

20:50

phrase that you used retailing retail

20:53

merchandising authoress what did it

20:54

called the course it was a two-year

20:56

course I need a lot of good friends

20:59

there I kept in touch with not a lot of

21:03

them but one particular one who

21:05

unfortunately passed away about a year

21:08

and a half ago I used to hit a cottage

21:10

up to here in Huntsville and we became

21:13

very good friends over all those years

21:15

but as you get older and everybody else

21:21

gets older along with you so I don't

21:23

have too many friends left I understand

21:27

and again we may be reiterating

21:31

something but you you went to Ryerson

21:33

really at the urging of your father and

21:36

grandmother yes my father at this time

21:41

was very very active and

21:44

and my grandmother and my uncle Claude

21:48

Wardell own Wardell store and he was

21:54

quite interested and hopeful that i

21:56

would go through get some proper

21:59

education and come back and end up on

22:02

the store which I did and I've never

22:06

regretted it we had many I have many

22:10

many years in this door and made a lot

22:14

of friends and it more dolls I still

22:19

have people say what I really miss your

22:22

store and you know we're closed in

22:24

nineteen eighty and now this is 19 @

22:29

2015 so I had a pretty good name over

22:33

after all those years I like to touch on

22:36

your great-grandfather Matthew Wardell

22:38

it was a general merchant in town

22:40

whooping does his store here in the

22:42

1890s and try to relate to us some of

22:46

the lesser known facts about Matthew

22:48

that not just everyone with no but you

22:50

would know because you're a member of

22:52

the family when now my great-grandfather

22:56

was I guess he was pretty still active

23:01

in the business and they had this chap

23:04

came in they used to stay up until

23:06

midnight and on 30 nights and this chap

23:12

came in you wanted to buy a pair of

23:14

pants to work in and so Matthew showed

23:18

him the pants and told him how much they

23:23

were and he decided that they couldn't

23:26

couldn't pay that much and it probably

23:28

they be twenty dollars at the very most

23:31

maybe even not much that much but anyway

23:34

so they bickered and dickered and fella

23:37

left and came back a couple of times

23:40

Matthew wouldn't wouldn't lower his

23:44

price so the fellow finally came back

23:48

just awfully close to midnight that's

23:52

when they closed but anyway he got in

23:56

before the

23:57

store was locked up and closed and he

24:00

said that he'd take the pants he finally

24:02

decided he'd buy the pants and I got

24:06

father of a great grandfather's price so

24:10

my grandfather great-grandfather they

24:12

looked at him he says you're too late it

24:15

felt that what do you mean he said we're

24:17

closed we don't do business on Sunday

24:20

and he wouldn't sell the patents well I

24:26

understand your grandfather your

24:27

great-grandfather Matthew was

24:30

responsible for the loss of its first

24:32

store in hustle in 1911 how did that

24:34

happen well yeah they had the store

24:36

which is across the street from for the

24:39

present building is and they had a big

24:43

big box stove I guess you'd call it in

24:47

the store do well to help heat the

24:51

building is well they lived above the

24:53

store in those days and and he put a

24:58

whole bunch of cardboard and paper and

25:01

lit of matching got a great big fire

25:04

burning in actually it got so bad that

25:08

it burned the star dog or the whole

25:10

building down and then they had to

25:13

locate across the street from where that

25:16

where the present building is

25:18

understanding math you liked his name

25:22

and can you tell us the story about

25:25

about Matthew wanting you to be named

25:30

Matthew yes when I was born I guess I

25:35

was the first well I was the first

25:37

grandchild or a child born and Matthew

25:43

offered my father five dollars if they

25:46

need me Matthew and my dad turned him

25:50

down that's that which is kind of mean

25:53

but I'm for at fortunately I have a

25:58

grandson called Matthew he has a twin

26:01

brother which is really nice

26:03

for me wonderful now you are the last

26:07

dollar Wardell start family business

26:09

spanning four generations starting with

26:12

yourself so everyone will know please

26:14

trace your lineage back to Matthew

26:17

Wardell the founder Wardell story so

26:22

should i start with bathrooms now when

26:23

you start with me I was the last person

26:28

involved with more dollar company and

26:32

those days over the years we've become

26:34

an incorporated company and so on and

26:39

before when i had it i bought my share

26:45

from my father Jack Nichols and he and I

26:50

for some time after we had bought Claude

26:54

Waddell's edges we ran the business for

27:00

several years my father and I he became

27:05

unable to handle the affairs of the

27:10

business anymore so i bought my share

27:14

from him and so it wasn't a business

27:19

that even though it was a for generation

27:22

business each person that was involved

27:26

in that business bought their share they

27:30

weren't left the sheer i believe i might

27:33

have been left a little bit at the end

27:35

from my father but most of it was

27:37

purchased by me now the previous

27:40

generation to your father was your

27:43

grandmother and what was her name and

27:45

how did she die into Matthew Wardell my

27:49

grandmother was Maude Nichols she

27:55

married a man by the name in nickels and

27:59

unfortunately I don't think she'd been

28:01

married that long she became pregnant

28:04

with my father and her husband died

28:10

before my father was born so I never

28:14

knew my grandfather

28:15

but that's how that's part of our

28:18

history and Maude was Matthew word else

28:22

doc Matthew was it yes okay now we got

28:26

that straight now I think that we've

28:29

indicated pretty thoroughly to the

28:32

audience so far that ordell's store was

28:36

pretty important to Huntsville it was

28:37

really a hustle institution for more

28:41

than 90 years approaching a hundred

28:43

years besides longevity one in your mind

28:46

made war dells an institution and that's

28:49

tough think what made as far as I can

28:52

see or from my experience when my father

28:57

and my father's brother grenville

29:00

nichols became involved in the business

29:05

then in those days we didn't have

29:08

tourist business like we do now or did

29:11

for many years my father and his brother

29:14

Grenville I would load up a car with

29:18

merchandise and they go around to the

29:21

resorts and set up a display of the

29:24

different kinds of merchandise we

29:28

carried and that was really how the

29:32

tourist business got started because

29:35

these people come up and they wouldn't

29:38

be like it is now but but there would be

29:40

several people who come from the states

29:43

or Toronto or wherever to have a holiday

29:46

or maybe build a cottage or something so

29:49

they got to know that that's well had a

29:53

good at least one good store in it that

29:55

they kick him in and do their shopping

29:56

and that's how our business our tourist

29:59

business really got started even before

30:02

that I'm thinking that you mentioned

30:06

that Wardell store really grew up with

30:10

herself yes it did grow up with

30:13

Huntsville many many many years ago on

30:20

the people that workers that work in the

30:23

bush cutting lumber and so on we get

30:26

paid by check or with a check and they

30:33

would come in and the staff award else

30:37

would make sure that they had enough

30:40

money on him to cash the check for these

30:43

guys because they would live they would

30:46

work until you know friday by the time

30:49

they got in there was no such thing as a

30:51

bank being open banks were an open on

30:54

saturday so they were able to cash their

30:57

checks at Wardell and this is how i

31:01

guess how it helped grow no one else

31:05

grow too because they were had

31:10

merchandise to sell and they also could

31:13

cash checks for these fellows and it

31:16

worked out quite well to that end then

31:19

Ward else became a bank really yes now

31:24

you excited to me some time ago a case

31:29

in point rather extreme case in point

31:32

but the man that came in and bought two

31:34

suitcases could you tell us that stuff

31:36

yes this chap would come in he was one

31:39

of the workers in the back in the in the

31:41

lumber business he came in many years

31:44

ago and he bought two suitcases and he

31:48

he by fella both with clothes new

31:52

clothing that he bought from for more

31:54

dells and then he had the whole weekend

31:58

to put up in order to put in and so on

32:01

so he'd find himself a lady friend and

32:04

and he'd spend a bit of time or the

32:08

weekend with this lady friend and he

32:11

spend his money and by the time he was

32:15

the weekend was over he didn't have any

32:18

money left but he had two suitcases full

32:20

of clothing so he'd bring back one of

32:23

those suitcases to get his money back so

32:27

he wouldn't be completely out of money

32:29

and he did this for some time until

32:32

finally the stuff ordell's realized what

32:36

he was up to they were

32:37

River his bank so we refused to sell

32:41

them any more clothing and wouldn't give

32:44

him any money for any of the clothing he

32:46

had but that was kind of an interesting

32:49

story very interesting one more thing

32:52

you mentioned to me that Ward else phone

32:55

number was number one what does that

32:58

signify to you or else had the first

33:01

phone in Huntsville and as a result the

33:05

phone number was number one so when

33:09

somebody pick up their phone and in one

33:12

of foam war tells the operator would say

33:15

number please and the first one would

33:17

say number one perfect we're going to

33:24

close down our interview pretty soon but

33:27

before we do I want you two to talk

33:31

about briefly what you did workwise

33:34

after war dells was closed but can you

33:37

elaborate yes after we closed the store

33:41

and we had an auction and you know got

33:46

everything out of the business out of

33:48

the building and so on and then I ended

33:52

up renting the building and then

33:54

eventually selling the building I work

33:57

for my cousin bill Nichols who owned and

34:01

operated the council in emails and Bill

34:06

had offered me a job after I closed

34:08

wargals and which I accepted and I

34:15

worked there for 16 years and I ended up

34:20

as bills credit manager so I spent quite

34:24

a bit of time in small claims court and

34:28

collecting money because in those days a

34:31

lot of people didn't seem to think they

34:34

have to pay bill I just you know he

34:36

could he could handle it without being

34:38

paid so i had tyke i added up make pay

34:42

my salary by the money i collected for

34:45

several years just like the fact that

34:48

you spent so much time

34:50

coppin small claims court you actually

34:53

have a reputation around town being a

34:55

very nice guy over the years we've had

34:58

many good friends in town and I know

35:01

some of them but I'd like to drop a few

35:03

names and ask you to comment on your

35:05

relationship with the memories of these

35:07

people first of all let's start with Bob

35:09

and Jane Hutchison Bob and Jane

35:11

Hutchison were make neighbors of my wife

35:14

and I they lived up the hill above me

35:16

ask brother and over the years that we

35:22

bought as a bit older than I but my wife

35:26

and I had a sauna that we bought and put

35:29

it in our basement and Bob and Jane

35:32

would come down quite frequently in the

35:34

wintertime and have a sauna and as we

35:37

thought we got to know them much better

35:39

too and by my kids my children or our

35:44

children and dodges and children played

35:48

together for many years now we know bill

35:52

Nichols was your cousin but could you

35:54

comment further on on your socializing

35:57

with Bill and his wife Marian bill and I

36:02

I was six years older than bill and so

36:07

you know what's up like that being that

36:09

much older we really didn't really get

36:13

to know each other until we were

36:16

probably late teens or early 20s and

36:21

this is before I even start to work for

36:23

bill and we became much closer we did a

36:28

lot of things together and then as I

36:31

mentioned earlier I was working for him

36:36

and I ended up with his credit manager

36:39

and so then you know we were we were

36:43

like brothers we really were his wife

36:46

Marian kept saying you know your

36:48

brothers and I guess we were more like

36:50

brothers and cousins I know that you

36:54

went to school with bud Jesse and his

36:56

wife Kathy came from Toronto as your

36:58

wife Pat came in Toronto can you comment

37:01

on

37:01

your relationship with button Kathy

37:04

jockey yes bud the caffeine and my wife

37:08

and Pat came down so about the same time

37:13

very close to the same time they're both

37:15

from Toronto didn't know anybody up here

37:19

except button I and it was I think it

37:22

was quite lonely for both of them as we

37:25

became as we had children and so on and

37:29

Pat and Kathy would be seen pushing

37:34

carriages up the main street each of

37:37

them and they became very very good

37:40

friends for many many years and we were

37:44

always friends but just passed away

37:46

about a year ago I still see Kathy who

37:52

is still a sweetheart and we're still

37:57

friends after all those years and that's

37:59

going back 60 years I guess no dying

38:04

even very very generous with your time

38:06

it's been a very long interview perhaps

38:08

from your point of view not for mine but

38:10

from New York's I like thank you very

38:12

much for your unique contribution

38:13

tonsils are all history project Thank

38:16

You Wayne and I've known Wayne for some

38:18

years to i curled with them so we're not

38:21

strangers and we haven't got a fight

38:24

that thank you for giving me the

38:28

opportunity to talk about my life you

38:31

thank you

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Huntsville Oral Histories - Interview with Don Nickalls


Wayne Cooper interviews long time resident Don Nickalls